OFFICE | 14 March 2018

Annka Kultys Gallery

Molly Soda has been interviewed by Office Magazine writer Conor Hudnut. Soda details the re-staging of a work at NADA that was originally shown at 315 Gallery during her solo show I’m just happy to be here last summer. The work is a laptop containing a selection of Soda’s files that invited the viewer to directly interact with it. But, for NADA, Soda added a new twist: “I created a chat-box that talks to you. The bot lives on the computer with the files, and it’s kind of customer service-y. Maybe it’s just a bot, maybe it’s me, the artist, or maybe it’s whatever you want it to be. It’s there to interact with you, if you’re interested in doing so.” You can read the full interview here.

ART NEWS | 8 March 2018

ANNKA KULTYS GALLERY

Art News’ Andy Battaglia and Alex Greenberger review Molly Soda’s installation for 315 Gallery’s booth at the NADA fair. The authors write: “Some work at NADA stares down the digital sphere. Brooklyn’s 315 Gallery is showing Molly Soda, who became an internet celebrity a few years back for posting her feminist selfies on Instagram, which censored them. Such notoriety is in the past, however, and Soda has turned her attention to the difficulties of intimacy with strangers online.” You can read the full fair re-cap here.

ARTSY | 7 June 2017

Annka Kultys Gallery

Molly Soda was interviewed by Artsy on her current solo show at 315 Gallery in Brooklyn. “ ‘I’m just happy to be here’ presents a multitude of Mollys… Soda taps into a tension familiar with anyone who has ever used the internet: the inevitable discrepancy between the way we’re perceived online …and the way we actually are in real life”, writes Casey Lesser. Read the full article here.

ARTRABBIT | 1 June 2017

Annka Kultys Gallery

Molly Soda’s solo exhibition ‘I’m just happy to be here’ at Gallery 315 in New York is reported on Artrabbit. The author writes: “In her most recent exhibition Soda brings many of the themes she’s played with in the past a step further, encouraging her patrons to interact with her work in a physical space.” Read the full article here.